Waypoint Realty Group LLC



Posted by Waypoint Realty Group LLC on 8/17/2017

Your pets adore you, rushing to greet  you as soon as you walk through the door. They’re cuddly, cute and incredibly affectionate. The way that your pets respond to you can blind you to bad habits that your pets engage in, habits that damage your property value. What about those nasty pet hairs? After several months, we can get used to the smell, allergens and pests that our pets bring indoors, allowing hard odors and contaminants to fester in our furniture and especially in carpet fibers. Buyers with allergies pick up the scent of pet hairs and turn away. Other home buyers may request that their realtor not show them houses where pets live. But, that doesn't mean that you don't have options. To reduce pet dander, preventing pet hairs and scents from getting embedded in your home, regularly wash and brush your pet’s hair. Feed your pet a healthy, protein rich diet. Use flea repellants as needed and keep veterinary appointments. To keep furniture and rugs free of pet hair, pick up stray hairs as soon as you spot them. The longer pet hair is left on the floor and on furniture, the deeper it can sink into carpet and furniture fibers. Hardware stores have plastic covers that you can place on furniture which is another solution to reducing pet hairs. When you vacuum, use vacuum extensions to clean furniture fibers. Consider using pet carpet shampoos for a deep clean. Training yields lots of rewards If your pet isn’t properly trained, you could deal with more challenges. For example, your cat or dog might go to the bathroom behind decorative plants, the sofa or a chair that’s placed in a room corner. When dogs and cats feel anxious, they could chew on furniture or claw at the bottom of doors. Some pets have clawed holes into carpet as they anxiously tried to work their way inside a room or out of the house. Outside your house, pets may regularly splash mud and dirt along your home's bottom trim, creating hard to remove stains. Get in the habit of washing your house, especially areas where pets linger, to keep the curb appeal of your home at peak levels. Pets could also dig holes in the yard, a natural instinctive habit for dogs. Let these poor pet habits go and you could end up needing to re-sod your entire back yard several years later. Hunger, smelling scents under the ground and hearing sounds are some reasons why dogs dig. Workarounds include taking your four-legged pets to the vet to ensure that their diet is adequate and taking pets for walks and runs. Exercise can help eliminate the buildup of stress in your pet. To prevent pets from digging holes in the yard, you could also place large rocks near base of the fence and place chicken wire under the ground near the fence. Reward your pet for positive behaviors. Massage can help to calm an anxious pet. So too can relaxing yourself and speaking in a calm voice to your pet. Monitor the results. Taking action now could save you hours of washing and scrubbing or a hefty professional cleaning bill to get your house in good condition should you decide to move.





Posted by Waypoint Realty Group LLC on 8/10/2017

Selecting the perfect color can be difficult. Using a color wheel is a good idea when trying to come up with a color scheme, or colors with confidence. When using a color wheel remember opposites attract, each one of these opposite colors complement each other. When using complementary colors make sure one color is more subtle than the other. Another way to use the color wheel is to use colors next to each other. These are related colors which create a less contrasting effect. Using the color wheel you can also choose a monochromatic scheme. This is created by taking any one of the 12 color hues on the wheel and repeating it in various shades, tints and tones. Using the color palates base on one basic color gives you the monochromatic effect. Choosing this style can make the process of coming up with a good color scheme in your home a little easier by having one general color in mind. This style helps to create an elegant look for your home because all the colors flow so smoothly together. Incorporating colors into the home can be over whelming for some people. A good way to see what colors work well together is to look at wrapping paper and gift bags. In the gift wrap isle you will see unusual color combinations that you may be able to bring into your home. Your color scheme can also be inspired by simply pulling colors from the furnishing in the room. No matter how you decide on a color scheme don’t be afraid to take a chance. Remember paint is very forgiving it can always be changed if you are unhappy with the results.





Posted by Waypoint Realty Group LLC on 8/3/2017

Living in an old home is like reading an old book. When you walk through an old home you can't help but notice that there is history right within the walls. Small differences, like low height of the doorknobs, take you back in time to when we were a different society with different needs and expectations. Just like old books, however, old homes sometimes require extra care to keep in good condition. Don't get me wrong--when people boast that their old home has "strong bones" they could certainly be right. But there are some things you might have to cope with living in an old home that aren't a huge concern in a new one. If you're thinking about purchasing an old home, read this list of things you should be aware of before you buy. It isn't meant to deter, just to inform so that you're ready for the challenges you'll face when that day comes. And, if you truly love the experience of living in an old house, the work will be well worth it.

Old doesn't mean decrepit

Let's go back to our book analogy from earlier. If you have a book from the late 1800s that has been stored in a dry place, hasn't been thrown around much, and always had conscientious owners who respected it enough to repair the binding when needed, your book will be in great shape. The same is true for old homes. Oftentimes, it only takes a quick glance around the home and a peek at the foundation to see if the home has been taken care of. Just because a house was built in the 1800s doesn't mean it hasn't been renovated periodically and maintained properly.

Warning signs

If you are thinking of buying an old home, here are some things you should look out for before you sign the dotted line. Don't forget to have the home inspected by a professional as well, since they will give you a much more detailed analysis of the problems a home might have.
  • Ancient HVAC. Aside from being prone to malfunctioning, old heating and ventilation systems could also prove to be dangerous and inefficient. Be sure to have a professional inspect the entire system.
  • Pests big and small. Over the years homes begin to develop vulnerabilities to ants, termites and other pests. Similarly, don't be surprised if you find mice, bats, or other furry creatures around if the home has been empty for a while.
  • Hazardous materials. The builders of yore were excellent craftsmen, but they were using (unbeknownst to them) dangerous materials like lead and asbestos. If you have small children, even more of a reason to make sure the home is free of hazardous materials. Part of this check should also be for mold growth.
  • Inefficiencies. Old windows and poor insulation walls also tend to be issues with some old homes. Find out what the monthly utility bills cost to see how much work you'll need to do to bring them up to date.
  • Foundation issues. Eventually, nature prevails. Foundation cracks and deterioration are common problems in old homes, especially in climates like the Northeast with freezing temperatures and lots of snow, rain, and wind.




Tags: home   house   old homes   old   safety   homes   history  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Waypoint Realty Group LLC on 7/27/2017

Home is where the heart is and we all want to make sure the heart of our home, our family, is healthy and happy. Creating a home that sets your family up for success towards becoming a healthier, and therefore happier family can lead to happy memories you can cherish forever. Keep reading for tips and habits you can enforce and lead by example in your home to encourage your family to make healthy choices both mentally and physically. Practice gratitude. At the end of each day, perhaps even around the dinner table review your family's favorite moments of the day and what they are grateful for. Creating space for these moments is akin to writing out gratitude lists which have been scientifically proven to help increase happiness. This habit also has the added benefit of bringing your family closer together . Spend time together at home. Whether it’s a weekly game night where your family gathers around the kitchen table to play board games, huddles up in the living room to play some video games or spend the day playing a game of ball in the backyard. Taking time to enjoy each other at home base creates happy memories and helps your family become more tight knit. Create zones in your house. Set up zones for activities such as tech only, homework, play, solo time and even family time to help encourage focus on the activity at hand while maintaining balance. By creating specific zones you help hardwire your family’s brains to focus on the activity at hand and allow a way for other members of the family to respect that person’s time while they are engaging in an activity. Healthy Choices. Set out bowls of fruits, pre-cut veggies to snack on and keep a jug of cold water on hand to guide your family towards healthy choices on their own. This works especially well with younger children so that you can allow them to make their own food choices at snack time and ensure you are making it easier for them to reach for the good stuff. Encourage physical activity. If you child is interested in an afterschool sport, practice being enthusiastic and supportive of their new interest. Spend time practicing with them in the backyard and volunteer to host their friends over for a group practice in the backyard. If your partner is interested in joining the gym or an adult league, leave room in your family’s schedule for them to easily stick to and enjoy their new commitment. Make relaxation easy for your family. Consider what each member of your family’s go-to technique to relax is and set up ways for them to easily do so. If your children love to draw or paint set up an art station they can easily access at their discretion. If your partner enjoys curling up with a good book and some hot tea arrange a bookcase with their favorite titles within reach and keep tea making supplies at the forefront of your cabinet. Get outside. Sometimes it's important to get out of the house too. A few times a month schedule times for family trips to get outside and visit nearby trails. Whether you walk, hike or ride bikes as a family getting outdoors to enjoy fresh air and be active will improve your family’s health and guarantee some quality time together. We all want health and happiness for the ones we love. You can help promote healthy habits that lead to increased happiness for your family with a little preparation and guiding by example. Working with, playing with, and supporting each other along the way will guarantee a healthier, more tight knit family with loads of memories to cherish for years to come.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Waypoint Realty Group LLC on 7/20/2017

As the percentage of senior citizens continues to grow every year, more and more homeowners are taking a serious look at the possibility of having their aging parents move in with them. An increasingly popular idea is the notion of creating an "in-law apartment" to provide a private, but nearby living space for older members of the family.

As an alternative to remodeling one or more rooms to accommodate a live-in relative, some homeowners build an addition to their house. Those with an acre or more of land (and the budget) sometimes consider building a separate guest house on their property. In most cases, though, people tend to convert a portion of their homes to a secondary living unit.

If you're considering going this route, it's necessary to check with your town or city government to make sure you're in compliance with local ordinances, building codes, and zoning laws. Sometimes the approval process might be relatively simple, while in other situations, it could be more restrictive or complicated. The requirements vary widely from one location to another, but you never know until you ask!

A knowledgeable real estate agent can provide you with a lot of helpful information on the topic of in-law apartments. To find out whether your home is already approved for "multiple-unit occupancy," your local assessor, building department, or building inspector can provide the answer. They can also fill you in on requirements, restrictions, and guidelines for converting a living space to a secondary dwelling unit.

By approaching it with an open mind and a little bit of optimism, you might be pleasantly surprised with the practicality of welcoming an aging parent, grandparent, or other member of your extended family into your home. A separate living space may also be the ideal solution for a recent graduate or older adult child who isn't quite ready for the cost of full independence.

If you're currently in the market for a new home, you may even want to expand your "wish list" to include properties that have an approved secondary unit on it. Whether you're anticipating future family needs or toying with the idea of using the space to generate rental income, there are several potential advantages to having an apartment or guest house on the premises.

Your real estate agent can provide you with data on the availability of residential properties with "in-law apartments" and multiple unit occupancy features. They can also offer valuable insights on the future marketability of the property. While your main objective at this point may be finding a long-term place for your family to call home, choosing a property that's a good investment could make real estate ownership even more rewarding down the road.







Tags